Here are the six biggest takeaways from today’s leaked Russia dossier transcript

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In the first serious power move by a Senate Democrat during the course of the Trump-Russia controversy, Dianne Feinstein (D-CA), the ranking Judiciary Committee member, just went rogue, releasing the Fusion GPS testimony on the Christopher Steele Russia dossier that her Republican colleagues have been trying to conceal.

However, it can be hard to parse through all the details and figure out what the salient details are.

CNN’s chief national security correspondent Jim Sciutto tweeted out a thread today highlighting six main takeaways from the documents Senator Feinstein leaked.

Here they are.

  1. The leaked Fusion GPS Senate judiciary testimony disproves the Republican lie that the dossier’s conclusions were politically motivated, as former British spy Christopher Steele’s concerns about Trump’s vulnerability to Russian blackmail were seconded by the FBI.

2.  Alarmed that Trump’s exposure to Russian manipulation posed a major national security threat to the United States, Steele shared his intelligence with the FBI in September of 2016. 

The bureau assured him they were aware of the same evidence, as they had had a mole inside the Trump organization since at least July. 

What’s more, that same July, now-convicted former Trump foreign policy adviser, George Papadopoulos, had drunkenly spilled his guts about Trump-Russia connections to an Australian diplomat in London, who did his duty as an American intelligence ally, independently reporting the exchange to the FBI.

3. Fusion GPS co-founder and former Wall Street Journal investigative journalist, Glenn Simpson, testified that Steele alerted the FBI of what he considered to be a crime, unprompted by the Democratic National Committee, Fusion GPS itself, or even the Republican politicians purported to have first commissioned the dossier.  

4.  It is an act of great political courage that the Senate Judiciary Committee’s ranking Democrat, Senator Feinstein, released the Fusion GPS testimony, despite Republican chairman Chuck Grassley’s best efforts to conceal it. 

Grassley and his fellow judiciary Republicans, like Senator Lindsey Graham of South Carolina, went so far as to recommend a criminal investigation of Steele for blowing the whistle, in order to try to discredit proof of a Trump-Russia conspiracy to intervene in our electoral process in exchange for lifting Obama-era sanctions against Russia for their invasion of the Ukraine.

Feinstein defied them, in order to sound the alarms to the American people that their Executive Branch has been compromised by Russia. 

5.  All of these allegations were revealed to the Senate Judiciary Committee by Glenn Simpson while he testified under oath.

Simpson shared candidly and in meticulous detail, unlike Trump’s Attorney General Jeff Sessions who could “not recall” any contacts between the Trump campaign and Russia, until facts emerged that provoked a miraculous recovery of his memory.

6.  Steele is not some political hack, but a real-life James Bond who worked as an intelligence agent for Britain’s version of the CIA, called MI6.

Steele had deep intelligence experience in Russia and had cooperated with the FBI  when they were surveilling Russian assets in the United States.

As if all of that were not dramatic enough proof of Trump’s crimes, further details from the dossier show that he was involved in an international money laundering ring by Trump’s business associate and friend, Russian mob-linked, Putin-connected convicted felon, Felix Sater.

Suffice it to say, when the FBI, veteran former British intelligence agents, and Australian diplomats all agree that Trump is a president weaponized against the U.S. by Russia, you know you’ve got a problem.

With Feinstein’s bold maneuver today, she’s assured that Trump himself is the one with the biggest problem of all.

Follow Lucia Brawley on Twitter and at luciabrawley.com.

The post Here are the six biggest takeaways from today’s leaked Russia dossier transcript appeared first on Washington Press.

 

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